Anamnesis

Anamnesis means remembrance or reminiscence, the collection and recollection of what has been lost, forgotten, or effaced. It is therefore a matter of the very old, of what has made us who we are. But anamnesis is also a work that transforms its subject, always producing something new.

To recollect the old, to produce the new: that is the task of anamnesis.

Posted by Graham Lister on Friday, December 21, 2012 at 05:19 PM in
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Comments:

1

Posted by DanielS on December 21, 2012, 06:22 PM | #

For those who have not caught this yet:

Frank Salter: multi-culturalism, as the term is misused by elites in the west, its effects on majority White ethnic genetic interests.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=WOaBzBflnMY#!

2

Posted by Guessedworker on December 21, 2012, 06:39 PM | #

The answer of a neurologist or evolutionary psychologist to the question of how knowledge of something we know nothing about can be recognised will differ somewhat to that of Plato.  He argued that knowledge was stored in the soul in consequence of prior incarnations.  Our neurologist or psychologist might prefer to think that the basics of discrimination between what is real and not real are there in the structures of the human brain.  Were it not so - for instance, were the brain unable to discriminate for the adaptive more often than not - there could be no evolutionary process.

The fact of our existence demonstrates a discriminatory capacity we all possess.

3

Posted by DanielS on December 21, 2012, 06:42 PM | #

Indeed, we must be co-evolved in relation to environment.

4

Posted by Leon Haller on December 21, 2012, 07:00 PM | #

A classic text in the area:

http://press.umsystem.edu/(S(iq5au555uj4odh45zrha0u45))/product/Anamnesis,1429.aspx

5

Posted by Leon Haller on December 21, 2012, 07:03 PM | #

The above paste didn’t work. Will this?

http://www.amazon.com/Anamnesis-Collected-Works-Eric-Voegelin/dp/0826207375/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1356134459&sr=8-1&keywords=anamnesis

6

Posted by Leon Haller on December 21, 2012, 08:30 PM | #

(off-topic)

Hey, some good news for a change!

Maybe I’m wrong, but wasn’t the world supposed to end today, according to Mayans, Ickeists, and assorted others?

But I’m still here, and others are, too, I presume!

Must be deflationary for many, however. I wonder what preparations people made for this latest end of the world?

I reject New Ageism and Ickeism; am sceptical of poltergeists and demons (as a Catholic, however, I suppose I’m compelled to keep an open mind); think there’s less to most alleged conspiracies than initially appears; am agnostic on UFOs (seems reasonable that there should be life elsewhere, given the age and size of the universe, but until there is scientifically acceptable physical proof, mass hysteria about alleged though photographically uncaptured abductions doesn’t quite cut it) ...

... but I do believe in the existence of sasquatch. I’m aware of the sceptics’ arguments (why no skeletons or bones? well, how often do people find bones in forests?), but the preponderance of anecdotal, yet internally consistent, evidence through history is just too great to dismiss casually. I know there are a lot of hoaxes, esp in the Age of YouTube, but there were lots of accounts from the 19th and even 18th centuries when such concepts as “public relations” and hoaxing were not really prominent in people’s mental toolkits (plus people then had a greater sense of honor as well as integrity, born out of a far more unquestioned religiosity - the modern democratization of secularism really hasn’t been a good trend). The notion that some Christian Anglo-Saxon or Celtic backwoodsman would just out and out ‘make up’ that he was attacked by a “large, hairy manlike creature”, or even carried off by one for several miles before escaping, as a kind of public joke, just isn’t socio-psychologically tenable to me (note, I think the same about the resurrection of Christ, but that’s for another day).

I do think there is some kind of unclassified biped roaming the forests of Siberia and North America.

I also think the Fed Govt ought to commission a large scale, 21st Century “Lewis and Clark” style expedition to explore the vast underground caving systems of North America, about most of which we know little to nothing. What might live or hide in them?

What made the movie The Descent one of the finest horror films ever was not its script or acting (though its direction was superb), but the brilliance of its feature concept: that bloodthirsty creatures inhabit these subterranean worlds (along with putting an all-female cast in their way shock ). That idea is certainly possible. It is worth exploring, preferably by the military.

7

Posted by Leon Haller on December 22, 2012, 01:12 AM | #

(off topic again)

Dr. Lister has repeatedly accused me of being a “Hayekian right-liberal” simply because I understand free markets, and prefer capitalist prosperity to socialist poverty. I have likewise repeatedly disavowed the “there is no such thing as society” held by some genuine right-liberals.

So, I can’t resist posting the following, written as a rapid fire response on a Yahoo chatboard following an article about the Pope’s recent ringing defense of traditional marriage:

Does the loving Christ really condemn gays, when homosexuality is almost certainly genetic in origin? That isn’t the issue. There is a secular case against gay marriage. It concerns the survival of traditional society. Gay marriage is an attack on the religious and social underpinnings of Western civilization, just as mass immigration attacks the racial underpinnings. Not every issue is about “individual rights”, hard as that is for idiot Americans to believe. Collective society has an independent ontological value; it is worth preservation. Messing with already badly damaged traditional marriage is a further attack on civilization, and should be opposed for that reason, regardless of one’s views on God and sexual morality.

Upon rereading this after its posting, I realized how, even in throwaway comment fashion, I simply do not think like a classical or neoliberal. But true conservatives are quite as attached to private property as libertarians (Adam Smith famously said he had nothing to teach Burke, so thoroughly did the latter understand him), just as liberals are quite as attached to governmental healthcare as socialists.

 

8

Posted by Silver on December 22, 2012, 02:37 AM | #

Lister,

Interesting timing.  I’ve been doing a great deal of reminiscing and recollecting the last couple of days.  Who knows, maybe there really is something to that ‘synchronicity’ stuff. 

Haller,

the 19th and even 18th centuries when such concepts as “public relations” and hoaxing were not really prominent in people’s mental toolkits (plus people then had a greater sense of honor as well as integrity, born out of a far more unquestioned religiosity - the modern democratization of secularism really hasn’t been a good trend). The notion that some Christian Anglo-Saxon or Celtic backwoodsman would just out and out ‘make up’ that he was attacked by a “large, hairy manlike creature”, or even carried off by one for several miles before escaping, as a kind of public joke, just isn’t socio-psychologically tenable to me

Oh but of course, of course.  No way no how could the 19th century ever have produced a PT Barnum.  That’s completely untenable. 

If you’re really serious about bigfoot, do check out ‘communist race-realist’ Robert Lindsay’s blog.  He writes informatively about bigfoot quite often and is quite knowledgeable of the latest research, findings and thinking of the bigfoot community.

Personally, I wouldn’t rule out bigfoot on principle.  I’m just not at all interested in it. I certainly wouldn’t be awed or wowed if could be proven that bigfoots exist.  Bigfoot exists? Great. Big deal.  Who cares? I’ve got other fish to fry.

 

9

Posted by Desmond Jones on December 22, 2012, 05:12 AM | #

Our neurologist or psychologist might prefer to think that the basics of discrimination between what is real and not real are there in the structures of the human brain.

Or they could be learned. Either way, acting adaptively, as in men pursuing wealth and status, which appears to accrue a fitness benefit to the individual that does not necessarily extend to the group.

10

Posted by Leon Haller on December 22, 2012, 06:15 AM | #

Silver@8

Barnum was successful precisely because he was operating in a more honest and upright and thus gullible culture. In many ways, I blame the Jews for pioneering the modern culture of huxterism (porn, too), which in turn has bred up a culture of cynicism. People simply used to be more ingenuous, especially amongst Anglo-Saxon ‘salt of the Earth’ Americans. To know that I’m correct here does require considerable prior reading in early Americana - history and letters. People generally knew the difference between tall tales and sincere recollections. The “hairy creature” accounts I’ve read have had the ring of authenticity to them. I really don’t think they were (all, or even mostly) fictional.

I suppose the existence of Bigfoot isn’t very important in itself, though the romantic in me does find it kind of exciting if true. A quasi-human bipedal creature of massive proportions, yet so elusive? It would raise many interesting zoological questions. The additional implication that man might not be quite as in control of the planet’s fauna as he thinks is surely appealing in a kind of rebel way.

Finally, I have done some hiking and hunting in different places in the Pacific Northwest, and, though I was never alone, we did hike through some quite inaccessible areas - precisely the kind of places Bigfoot is alleged to haunt (alas, I never saw anything). A slight chill passes through me when I recall the many times as a kid we visited Yosemite - including times when I was hiking around only with a same age friend (esp during the week that my private grade school spent there). I’ve been doing some desultory BF research on the internet over the past year, and I’m shocked to learn of how many hikers have gone mysteriously missing from BF country, very much including Yosemite. I particularly recall this one day as a kid in 1980 hiking for about 6-7 hours on some remote trails, with very few other hikers, with only another young class friend (the school really should not have allowed that, for a multitude of safety concerns beyond BF kidnappings). Needless to say, we were both unarmed (unlike on my hiking and hunting trips in the past two decades).

Over the summer I listened to a radio interview (which is obtainable on the internet - “Coast to Coast with George Knapp - Paulides interview”) with the author of this book

http://www.nabigfootsearch.com/missing_411.html

and it was major freaky-weird. I mean REALLY WEIRD. People should listen to it, if only to ‘broaden your horizons’, as my mom used to say. The author is no intellectual or Ivy Leaguer, but he does seem competent, factual, methodical and empirical, and this information (about the tremendous number of unexplained and truly anomalous person disappearances in US National Parks over the past half-century, and earlier) really hit me insofar as I am myself a bit of an outdoorsman, and have traveled in many of these isolated areas especially in California (yes, there are many remote areas in CA, foreign impressions of terrible overcrowding, perhaps, notwithstanding), as well as Oregon, Washington State, British Columbia, Idaho, etc.

I like backcountry skiing and snowshoeing. Even at Lake Tahoe you’d be surprised at how quickly you can get ‘lost’, enveloped in dark woods. Some years back a girlfriend and I got lost shoeing, and we were still trudging our way through dense woods when nightfall descended too rapidly. Fortunately, I, being a Mr. Prepared Survivalist type - for which I’ve received much jocular verbal abuse at times by ignorant men and women - did have at least a mini-mag lite (and some unneeded flares and lite-sticks), and I was armed with a .38 snubby as well as a buck knife. But the former was meant for psychos or dirtbags, or to scare/wound a hungry mountain lion, and both would have been useless against a sasquatch. This guy’s research is a real wakeup call for me, especially if the Fed assholes now make it more difficult to carry weapons in state parks in the wake of the Conn school massacre.

Interesting stuff, relevant to Americans pretty much throughout the rural parts of the nation (but especially in forested areas).

11

Posted by DanielS on December 22, 2012, 09:04 AM | #

Anamnesis

I wonder if there has been, or could be, among pursuit of this term, the notion that competition was somehow not looked upon as necessary or good on a conscious, human level - not something admired?

We might presume that it is necessary on evolutionary levels and that it will continue to function on a unconscious levels, at least - the strongest sperm making its way to the egg, etc.

However, it seems to me that much evil and unnecessary waste might be traceable to the notion that competition is necessary and good on a deliberate level - for example in Darwinian evolution unbridled of conscious human regulation.

I look at these horrendously unjust instances of interracial couples, of some women whoring themselves out for just anybody, of some men having hundreds of women and I do to wonder..is that the best we can do and is unbridled competition really so great?

Personally, I don’t want to hear White men complaining that they are alone and can’t find a good White woman until they begin to conceive of a more cooperative way of channeling the wealth of our genetic capital and protecting against opportunistic outsiders. I especially do not want to hear them complaining that they are alone if they think miscegenation is a worthwhile price to pay for whatever supposed fruits competition may yield.

12

Posted by Graham_Lister on December 22, 2012, 04:48 PM | #

Interesting comments gentlemen.

Leon your interest in the possible hidden monsters lurking the stygian darkness of the wild forests of America reminded me of H.P. Lovecraft for some reason.

I’d love to imagine you opening up ‘Weird Realism: Lovecraft and Philosophy’ on Christmas Day!

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Weird-Realism-Philosophy-Graham-Harman/dp/1780992521/

And on that theme perhaps Mr. Renner enthusiastically reading ‘Combined and Uneven Apocalypse’ would be amusing to some?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Combined-Uneven-Apocalypse-Luciferian-Marxism/dp/1846944686/

But that sub title of ‘Luciferian Marxism’ might be cause for concern.

OK jokes aside Merry Christmas to everyone and catch you all in the New Year - unless the end of the world really does occur in the intervening period.

And remember Leben ist Leben - irreducibly so!

13

Posted by Graham_Lister on December 22, 2012, 07:21 PM | #

Of course I forgot to mention with regard to Lovecraft that Michel Houellebecq (one of my favourite novelists) is the author of a work of literary criticism on Lovecraft - ‘H. P. Lovecraft: Against the World, Against Life’. I think it might even have been his first publication.

Houllebecq is an interesting fellow – he has a scientific background/education – he graduated with a degree in agronomy an then worked in IT before making it as a professional writer. One of his best novels is ‘Les Particules Élémentaires’ (‘Atomised’ in English) which the critic Michiko Kakutani, described in ‘The New York Times’ as “a deeply repugnant read.” What higher praise could one wish for? Apparently Jonathan Franzen has described Kakutani as “the stupidest person in New York” for whatever that is worth. Franzen also wrote this line in ‘The Corrections’:

“The main difference between America and Lithuania, as far as Chip could see, was that in America the wealthy few subdued the unwealthy many by means of mind-numbing and soul-killing entertainments and gadgetry and pharmaceuticals, whereas in Lithuania the powerful few subdued the unpowerful many by threatening violence.”

Who could really disagree? Ignorance and distraction into triviality (in the right places and amongst the right people) can be enormously functional for some vested interests. I hope to develop, in the new year, my thoughts on our collective ‘intoxification’ with consumerism and the cultural politics thereof.

Returning to Houellebecq, one recurrent theme in Houellebecq’s novels is the ever increasing intrusion of the praxis of free-market economics into all forms of human relationships and particularly sexuality.

Although Houellebecq’s work is often credited with building on conservative, if not reactionary, ideas, (his crimes include obscenity, racism, misogyny and Islamophobia) for example in his critical depiction of the hippie movement, New Age ideology and the May 1968 generation, especially in ‘Les Particules Élémentaires’, his ideas oddly echo the ideas of the Marxist sociologist Michel Clouscard.

Coulscard (who oddly was as an Olympic sprinter in his younger days) developed a critique of libertarian liberalism

According to Clouscard, the ‘capitalism of seduction’ with its libertarian liberal face arises from the very evolution of the liberal-capitalist mode of production. It testifies to a qualitative jump of the accumulated quantities which, at a certain moment, reach a libertarian structure of society.

With its libertarian face, liberalism achieves its own teleological end and self-realisation, until the inevitable catastrophe. Clouscard speaks then about ‘neo-fascism’.

Some Clouscard quotations:

“Marx exclusively devoted himself to the study of the concentration of possession: capital, because it is the principle of political economy. We will propose the study of the drift of accumulation like the principle of phenomenological knowledge for studying the change of the bourgeoisie of free enterprise into the bourgeoisie of services and functions of the liberal society. Thus we will reveal an enormous unvoiced comment, that of the genealogy of this liberal society.”

“Neo-fascism will be the ultimate expression of libertarian social liberalism, of the unit which starts in May 68. Its specificity holds in this formula: All is allowed, but nothing is possible. The permissiveness of abundance, growth, new models of consumption, leaves the place to the interdict of the crisis, the shortage, the absolute depauperation. These two historical components amalgamate in the head, in the spirit, thus creating the subjective conditions of the neo-fascism. From Cohn-Bendit (libertarian leftist) to Le Pen (French extreme nationalist), the loop is buckled: here comes the time of frustrated revanchists.”

“The State was the super-structural authority of capitalist repression. This is why Marx denounces it. But today, with globalisation, the inversion is total. Whereas the state-nation could be the means of oppression of a class by another, it now becomes the means of resisting globalisation. It is a dialectical process.”

Food for thought.

But if anyone does find themselves with some spare time over the next few day you could do a lot worse that picking up a Houellebecq novel. I think Danny would enjoy Houellebecq in particular because of his critique of modern sexual politics which Danny has himself has somewhat echoed.

OK that really is all from me for now!

14

Posted by Dex on December 23, 2012, 02:30 AM | #

Michel Houellebecq (one of my favourite novelists)

Graham Lister,

Isn’t sex tourism to Thailand one of Houellebecq’s major topics?

15

Posted by Leon Haller on December 23, 2012, 02:32 AM | #

Leon your interest in the possible hidden monsters lurking the stygian darkness of the wild forests of America reminded me of H.P. Lovecraft for some reason.(GL)

Perhaps because I am a veritable embodiment of a typical Lovecraftian protagonist as described by the late paleoconservative Samuel Francis: (middle-aged) “scholarly bachelors of good breeding but dim prospects” (or something close - that from memory). I like to explore, albeit in a quiet, ‘just slipped out for a turn’ sort of way (I have nothing against the ‘heavy metal’ explorer types, with their cameras and mounds of equipment and general ‘gung-hoism’, but the trouble, expense, often danger, and even arrogance, in a sense, of that mode of travel never appealed to me, even in the prime of youth). I also like lonely walks, and - gulp! - forest solitude.

[The other scary thing about a lot of these mysterious disappearances is that they occurred in much less isolated places than many venues I have explored; that is, along precisely the kinds of tracks that I have indeed thought safe to traverse alone and unarmed (well, except for a stout walking stick and my buck knife), figuring they were so close to civilization that I would be in no danger - absent a heart attack! - from wild animals (which is not really true, given that mountain lions often come right into suburban areas; OTOH, there have been very few male fatalities from wild cats in North America, plus I’m big, and figured I could fight one off just with my staff) ... but sasquatches have been repeatedly sighted in just such areas, which is what I had not known until this very year - and knives and sticks and maybe even most handguns would be of little avail against one of these big fellows.]

I am a great fan of Lovecraft, and have read all his stories and novellas, some (At the Mountains of Madness, “The Rats in the Walls”, “The Dunwich Horror”, “The Shadow Out of Time”, etc) several times. He was not a truly great literary figure, imo, but he was a master of atmosphere and sustaining reader interest. Plus, he was a good racialist!

I bought this edition of his collected work for a mere $12.95 a few years ago. Look at the price now! I should have bought a bunch of copies as an investment. But who knew?

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/h-p-lovecraft-h-p-lovecraft/1100240763?ean=9781435107939&isbsrc=Y&

Houellebecq might be very good on Lovecraft. I’ve read only the following work of Lovecraft criticism, which made little impression on me:

http://www.amazon.com/Lovecraft-Study-Fantastic-Maurice-Levy/dp/0814319564/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1356234235&sr=8-1&keywords=lovecraft+levy

Speaking of Houllebecq, I do need to read his stuff. I’ve actually purchased remainder copies of Platform and The Possibility of an Island, but I haven’t yet read them. About a half dozen years ago, I came across a copy of his novella Lanzarote in a local library, and sat and read it in one sitting. Unfortunately, it, too, made little impression (I recall a tourist and some lesbians; can’t remember anything else of the plot). I understand he is a kind of nihilistic Islamophobe, something of an enfant terrible of contemporary French letters. I thought Raspail’s The Camp of the Saints was a genuinely great work of modern literature, one of the supreme dystopian novels of the last century. I suspect I won’t end up holding Houellebecq in quite the same regard, but any rightist author with a real following has earned a look from me.

I’d love to imagine you opening up ‘Weird Realism: Lovecraft and Philosophy’ on Christmas Day! (GL)

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Weird-Realism-Philosophy-Graham-Harman/dp/1780992521/

Maybe you could explain to me exactly what Speculative Realism is. I looked at Wiki, and at their academic journal, Speculations, and still don’t really know. I suspect you are being naughty and facetious, trying to put some post-(or perhaps, post-post-) modernist ashes in my Christmas stocking.

For something perhaps at the intersection of Lovecraftian cosmology and depressive metaphysics (maybe even with a dash of Spec Real tossed in) this seems likely to be feces in anyone’s Christmas supper:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Conspiracy-Against-Human-Race/dp/0984480277/ref=pd_sim_b_3

Lastly, never heard of Clouscard; found the first two quotes basically unintelligible. It would be helpful if sociologists and ‘phenomenologists’ of capitalism studied a bit of actual economics; nothing too taxing, of course ...

Merry Christmas to all!

Out.

Haller

16

Posted by Wandrin on December 23, 2012, 11:03 AM | #

“The State was the super-structural authority of capitalist repression. This is why Marx denounces it. But today, with globalisation, the inversion is total. Whereas the state-nation could be the means of oppression of a class by another, it now becomes the means of resisting globalisation. It is a dialectical process.”

Yes.

17

Posted by Thorn the armed and dangerous on December 23, 2012, 12:55 PM | #

armed with a .38 snubby

You might consider pgrading your .38 with a Ruger .357 LCR. I load mine with .357 Hornady critical defence 125 grain JHPs.  These self defence bullets sport a MV @ 1500 fps with approx 500 ft-pds of energy. Of course that’s no substitute for a 30.06 or 308 rifle, but it WILL allow you avoid getting your ass chewed off by a mountain lion or a black bear.

S&W makes a fine .357 snubby too but the trigger pull on the Ruger LCR is much more user friendly.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bkRQb53woM4

18

Posted by Graham_Lister on December 23, 2012, 05:29 PM | #

OK I’m briefly back - can’t help myself.

I think GW and others might enjoy these offerings:

“The Uprising: On Poetry and Finance” by Franco “Bifo” Berardi

The Uprising is a manifesto for today’s precarious times, and a rallying cry in the face of the catastrophic and irreversible crisis that neo-liberalism and the financial sphere have established over the globe. In his newest book, Franco “Bifo” Berardi argues that the notion of economic recovery is complete mythology. The coming years will inevitably see new surges of protest and violence, but the old models of resistance no longer apply. Society can either stick with the prescriptions and “rescues” that the economic and financial sectors have demanded at the expense of social happiness, culture, and the public good; or it can formulate an alternative. For Berardi, this alternative lies in understanding the current crisis as something more fundamental than an economic crisis: it is a crisis of the social imagination, and demands a new language by which to address it. This is a manifesto against the idea of growth, and against the concept of debt, the financial sector’s two primary linguistic means of manipulating society. It is a call for exhaustion, and for resistance to the cult of energy on which today’s economic free-floating market depends. To this end, Berardi introduces an unexpected linguistic political weapon - poetry: poetry as the insolvency of language, as the sensuous birth of meaning and desire, as that which cannot be reduced to information and exchanged like currency. If the protests now stirring about the world are to take shape and direction, then the revolution will be neither peaceful nor violent - it will be linguistic and imaginative, or will not be at all.

and

“The Making of the Indebted Man: Essay on the Neo-liberal Condition” by Maurizio Lazzarato

The debtor-creditor relation, which is at the heart of this book, sharpens mechanisms of exploitation and domination indiscriminately, since, in it, there is no distinction between workers and the unemployed, consumers and producers, working and non-working populations, between retirees and welfare recipients. They are all “debtors,” guilty and responsible in the eyes of capital, which has become the Great, the Universal, Creditor. Both public debt and private debt has become a major concern of economic and political leaders. Maurizio Lazzarato argues that, far from being a threat to the liberal-capitalist economy, debt lies at the very core of the neo-liberal project. Through a reading of Karl Marx’s lesser-known youthful writings on John Mill, and a rereading of writings by Friedrich Nietzsche, Gilles Deleuze, Felix Guattari, and Michel Foucault, Lazzarato demonstrates that debt is above all a political construction, and that the creditor/debtor relation is the fundamental social relation of Western societies. Debt cannot be reduced to a simple economic mechanism, for it is also a technique of “public safety” through which individual and collective subjectivities are governed and controlled. Its aim is to minimize the uncertainty of the time and behavior of the governed. We are forever sinking further into debt to the State, to private insurance, and, on a more general level, to corporations. To insure that we honour our debts, we are at once encouraged and compelled to become the “entrepreneurs” of our lives, of our “human capital.” In this way, our entire material, psychological, and affective horizon is upended and reconfigured. How do we extricate ourselves from this impossible situation? How do we escape the neo-liberal condition of the indebted man? Lazzarato argues that we will have to recognize that there is no simple technical, economic, or financial solution. We must instead radically challenge the fundamental social relation structuring neo-liberal capitalism: the system of debt.

Now remember Glenn Beck and other ‘conservatives’ find such people dangerous and advises completely avoiding such outré material. Recall also that a run-away and totally out of control regime of casino capitalism, of at least some $700 trillion worth of bets upon bets, in which those making the bets always win (and if it looks like they might lose the taxpayer will always write a bail-out cheque), is an entirely good thing and nothing to worry about. Indeed criticism of such a system of ‘free-market enterprise’ is deeply un-American. Sean Hannity and Tucker Carlson told me so.

19

Posted by Silver on December 23, 2012, 09:39 PM | #

Now remember Glenn Beck and other ‘conservatives’ find such people dangerous and advises completely avoiding such outré material.

Personally, I’d recommend avoiding it because it’s complete horseshit.  On the other hand, it can also be instructive to expose people to the kinds of rot the deranged, reality-hating marxist mentality produces as it desperately attempts to retain some relevance in the world by cashing in on the alienation suffered by unfortunates as they do their best to deal with the lunatic society that the hardcore leftist excrement itself contributed so much to bringing about.

Recall also that a run-away and totally out of control regime of casino capitalism, of at least some $700 trillion worth of bets upon bets, in which those making the bets always win

Lol.  I guess you feel entitled to your own reality, eh?  Not so much separating you from a J. Richards after all, then.

20

Posted by Silver on December 23, 2012, 09:50 PM | #

Lister, I don’t know how you reconcile enjoying Italy and feeling like you’re in a ‘real country’ with the fact that leftist sickos like those who evidently wow you with their pretty prose would have hanged the Medicis and denounced Michelangelo as a corporate tool.

And to say nothing of the fact that these sicko clowns care so little about race-replacement they can’t even bring themselves to admit its occurring let alone that it’s undesirable. 

Thus are your champions, Lister.

21

Posted by Leon Haller on December 23, 2012, 10:13 PM | #

OK, I’m back, too, pissing off the GF (WTF, I’m waiting for her!)

Dr. Lister:

I will ask you, YET AGAIN, rather than just criticizing the ‘excesses’ of capitalism, what would your preferred political economy look like? If you are going to insist on dragging extraneous anti-capitalist jeremiads into what is supposed to be a white preservationist / Euronationalist site, then I think you have a duty to offer non-socialists something of your own that we might sink our teeth into.

Exposing some deleterious or unsavory aspect of neoliberal globalism (itself hardly identical to capitalism per se) is all well and good, but the fact that criticisms can only go one way here due to lack of proffered alternatives (this, incidentally, sooooo typical of the history of snotty socialist, esp Marxist, thought: lots of specific, and of course misplaced, critiques of capitalism, with only the vaguest outlines of the actual economic layout of the presumed future collective workers’ paradise) is rather a cheap rhetorical device, don’t ya think?

Of course try this pitch-perfect nugget from “Bifo”,

It is a call for exhaustion, and for resistance to the cult of energy on which today’s economic free-floating market depends. To this end, Berardi introduces an unexpected linguistic political weapon - poetry: poetry as the insolvency of language, as the sensuous birth of meaning and desire, as that which cannot be reduced to information and exchanged like currency. If the protests now stirring about the world are to take shape and direction, then the revolution will be neither peaceful nor violent - it will be linguistic and imaginative, or will not be at all.

and see exactly how far it gets you in the boardroom or on the trading floor (not to say the pub).

Mind you, if your oppose taxpayer bailouts of rip-off financiers, then I’m with you, as are all libertarians and true conservatives. But I think you conflate anti-capitalist (plutocratic) capitalism with real capitalism.

[Please also translate (I mean into real English, not Left-speak) the quotes from Clouscard, as well as explaining Speculative Realism. (Thanks)]

22

Posted by Desmond Jones on December 24, 2012, 02:47 AM | #

I look at these horrendously unjust instances of interracial couples, of some women whoring themselves out for just anybody, of some men having hundreds of women and I do to wonder..is that the best we can do and is unbridled competition really so great?

The issue here is not unbridled competition but no competition for control of sexuality. Thus altruism is an example of a learned adaptive behavior that directly influences the genetic composition of a population positively until relinquished to the state based mechanisms, diffused widely, becoming highly destructive. Thus the battle with Islam to render familial violence in defense of family honour untenable.

23

Posted by DanielS. on December 24, 2012, 03:07 AM | #

Desmond, you take a different and interesting angle. Its a valid point you make, a good point - that White men are fettered from imposing control.

24

Posted by Leon Haller on December 28, 2012, 10:58 AM | #

Dr. Lister,

Given the title you have chosen, and your reference to Lovecraft, I cannot help but wonder what your opinion might be of the following?

http://www.amazon.com/UFOs-Generals-Pilots-Government-Officials/dp/0307716848/ref=cm_lmf_tit_5_rsrssi0

Seriously, look at the encomia - these are hardly lunatic fringe characters.

I wonder which version (of many) of UFOs and/or alien contacts (two separate issues) is correct. I also find it interesting to speculate how a verified UFO/alien encounter affects the racial struggle.

25

Posted by Graham_Lister on December 28, 2012, 04:48 PM | #

I don’t have the time nor inclination to post anything too involved but I’m enjoying Michael O’Meara’s review-essay on how the Irish became white.

http://www.counter-currents.com/2012/12/how-the-irish-became-white-part-1/

http://www.counter-currents.com/2012/12/how-the-irish-became-white-part-2/

Love these little snippets:

“The single positive feature of the historic Left – its defense of the ‘people’ from their exploiters – has revealingly become a thing of the past. The postmodern, militantly anti-racist, white-hating, sexually ambivalent, Jew-dominated Left of today (whose goals are comprehensible solely in terms of Stoddard’s ‘San Domingo’) no longer champions the cause of white working people resisting the often ruinous conditions imposed by economic elites; it doesn’t even resist the growing police state; instead, it endeavors to deconstruct everything that once guaranteed social decencies and the common good.”

“Even more than nineteenth-century Englishmen, Americans were devotees of progress, prosperity, and industrialism and could not but disdain the primitive Irish peasants, whose propensity to ‘riot, outrage, and atrocity’, were taken as threats to civilized life and property. But there was more. Like the unfortunate Highlanders, the Irish were no friend of the Scottish Enlightenment, the ideological crucible of world capitalism, and ardently resisted capitalism’s anti-traditionalist assault on their way of life. John Mitchel, one of the greatest nineteenth-century Protestant champions of Irish nationalism – familiar with the inside of both American and English prisons – characterized the Carthaginian middle class in ways that were no less true of the American Northerner, who, he argued, ‘worships only money, prays to no other than money, would buy and sell the Holy Ghost for money, and believes that the world was created, is sustained and governed, and will be saved by the only one true immutable Almighty Pound Sterling’. Mitchel’s nationalist hatred of imperial Britain (which had the same penchant for mass destruction and desecration as twentieth-century US imperialism) went hand in hand with his rejection of liberal modernity and its assault on the larger European heritage.”

Mr. Haller would no doubt replace Sterling with the almighty Dollar as his true God.

“The nativists were defending who they were – which needs no justification. The problem rather was that the ‘nation’ they were defending was not actually a ‘nation’ — not a ‘descent group’, like European nations, having a common past, an established religion, a single source of authority and order, and a common genetic heritage – which meant they couldn’t rally the ‘nation’ as a nation . . . The nation that had emerged from the Revolution of 1776 was little more than a liberal ‘propositional nation’ (something like Renan’s ‘daily plebiscite’), founded on a supremacist idea of itself, derived from the Judaizing ideals of its Low Church Protestantism (what Joseph de Maistre called the sans-culottisme de la religion). Looking at the nation spawned by the Revolution, Gordon Woods writes in The Idea of America (2011), that: ‘To be American is not to be someone, but to believe in something’ – i.e., to believe in America as a democratic idea, not an organic body or an extended family, like a European nation or people. . . By definition, the American, as a democrat, was an individual defined – ultimately – by his relationship to the market and was thus potentially a ‘docile cosmopolitan’, while Ireland’s Catholic peasantry, still stuck in a pre-modern, pre-capitalist world, were not so prepared. The nativist resistance to Catholic immigrants accordingly merged with a larger struggle – not just between Catholicism and Protestantism, but tradition and modernity, agrarianism and industrialism, community and society.”

Hopefully as O’Meara is one of you own MR’s America readers/commentators will not get quite so ‘uppity’ if I continue to make similar points about the joyful wonders of Americanism?

Anyways, personally I can’t stand ‘Fenians’ - as a supporter of a notoriously antediluvian ‘reactionary’ ultra-Protestant Glasgow based football team what else would one expect? But don’t worry I’m only what we call a ‘90-minute bigot’. . . honest guv.

Now how does that chant go - hang the Pope with an orange rope, hang the Pope, hang the Pope! No. I’m thinking of this one:

Hullo, Hullo
We are the Billy Boys
Hullo, Hullo
You’ll know us by our noise
We’re up to our knees in Fenian blood
Surrender or you’ll die

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=APVthfIMVbw

I love a wee bit of po-mo sectarianism, especially at this time of year.

26

Posted by Silver on December 28, 2012, 07:59 PM | #

Hopefully as O’Meara is one of you own MR’s America readers/commentators will not get quite so ‘uppity’ if I continue to make similar points about the joyful wonders of Americanism?

You must be mentally ill or something.  There’s no way otherwise you could imagine anyone around here ever having gotten uppity in defense of the America described in your post.

27

Posted by DanielS on December 29, 2012, 04:44 AM | #

Thanks Graham, for pointing out those passages from O’Meara’s essay. In a cursory read, I’d have missed something - part of my recalcitrance to modernity, in particular its anti-racism, is somewhat traceable to Catholicism, its protection of some vital things and its relation to modernity’s connection with snobbery.

However, I think that Leon and Silver render valid issues.

Though O’Meara’s angle on the mere hubris of America’s proposition nation is not beyond critique itself - there were, and are, valid motives for its liberalism from tradition, certainly Catholic tradition as well - I doubt that there are many here, other than Jim, perhaps, who would take marked exception to O’Meara’s critique of America.

As for Leon, I guess he makes a point. It is rather the Marxist thing to do to criticize everything to death and then leave a void of traceable theory. The Frankfurt school was proud of being an anti-theory theory. Economics may well be more an art than a science, its thinking more like poetry than science, nevertheless, its most eloquent expressions ought to be intelligible and practical.

28

Posted by Evan on December 29, 2012, 04:09 PM | #

I doubt that there are many here, other than Jim, perhaps, who would take marked exception to O’Meara’s critique of America.

Probably because Bowery is the most or among the most American people here and has a better grasp on America and what actually happened to it.

O’Meara is biased and unreliable and admits so much himself: http://www.toqonline.com/blog/why-we-write-3/

“My Irish side harbors a certain grudge against the old Anglo-Protestant right”

 

29

Posted by DanielS on December 29, 2012, 04:58 PM | #

The Frankfurt school was proud of being an anti-theory theory. Economics may well be more an art than a science, its thinking more like poetry than science, nevertheless, its most eloquent expressions ought to be intelligible and practical.

I meant for that comment to be prodding but it probably comes across as condescending - sorry about that. Actually, I’d like to hear more concrete economic propositions from Graham and GW. I’ve liked what I’ve heard from them and Jim so far.

After all, Mises and Hayek strike me as anti-theory theories as well.

30

Posted by Desmond Jones on December 30, 2012, 03:43 PM | #

“My Irish side harbors a certain grudge against the old Anglo-Protestant right”

No fucking kidding!

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